Thursday, 12 January 2017

TBT: Lethal Weapon (1987)

Everyone knows the score when it comes to buddy cop movies. We'll be introduced to two police officers and will quickly discover that, unfortunately yet hilariously, the pair are polar opposites of each other. No matter where the difference comes from it will create tension as the pair try to come together to bring down the bad guy. It feels like we've seen the set-up in every fucking way possible by this point. It's a timeless classic that writers will continue to come back to. And who should we blame for this? Well, the idea of the odd couple is an incredibly old one but it was the 80s and 90s that really saw the whole buddy cop thing take off. As we all know, one of the greatest uses of the formula comes in a film that just so happens to be celebrating it's 30th anniversary this year. It's also a fucking classic film that I really just wanted to excuse to see after watching The Nice Guys. After all, there's no such thing as too much Shane Black.

On Tuesday I discussed the fact that, for whatever reason, I can't seem to distinguish between Russell Crowe and Mel Gibson in my head. I know I'm not a big fan of one of them but always forget which one it is. I think the confusion comes from my love of 80s movies. After all, Mel Gibson is the star of some of my favourite action films so I guess I assume he's the one I love. He isn't. He's just the kind of crazy, anti-Semitic guy who rants about everything these days. Yet, once upon a time, he was the unhinged super cop grieving for his dead wife. Along with Danny Glover and thanks to a sharp script from Shane Black, Mel Gibson has become forever linked with the buddy cop genre. 1987's Lethal Weapon quickly became the template for modern examples of these types of films and was the first in a long line of great scripts from Black. It's an important movie in film history but, more importantly, it's also a really good one.

Even though I've never been completely comfortable with the opening. Now I'm not talking about the death of a young woman as she falls from her top floor hotel balcony. No, I'm talking about the moment when Roger Murtaugh (Danny Glover) is surprised by his family whilst he's taking a bath. It's so fucking weird. I get that it's his birthday and they want to celebrate but give the man some privacy. Who wants their kids to sing happy birthday as their dad's dick is on full show? What kind of kid would be okay with that scenario? It's never sat right with me and it will always make me cringe.

Still, the moments passes and we quickly learn that Murtaugh is nearing retirement age and is looking for a quiet life. Obviously, that all changes when he's partnered with Martin Riggs (Mel Gibson) who, rumour has it, is either crazy or hoping to get sick pay by acting crazy. You see, Riggs has seen shit. He was an expert marksmen during the Vietnam War and is still haunted by his past. To top it all off, his beloved wife has died meaning he's living alone in an RV. He's got something of a death wish but fails to finish the job himself. It gives Mel Gibson plenty of chances to stare wildly into people's eyes and there are several weird and ugly close-ups of his unblinking, crazy expressions. So, why, I hear you ask, is this unhinged man allowed to continue working in law enforcement? Well, he's just that good a detective, goddammit.

The pair take on the case of the dead girl and discover that the apparent suicide is actually something much darker. The find themselves running from drugs barons and blonde henchmen. Really, the plot isn't really important. It's just a generic reason for getting the pair into situations where they must shoot or fight there way out. There's very little actual detective work but plenty of kidnappings, shoot outs, and terrible martial arts to make up for that. The thing that really matters with Lethal Weapon is Shane Black's script. He, once again, created a strong and sharp premise that includes plenty of great back and forth between the main pair. It became the staple for the film's to follow in its footsteps and pushed Black along the path to greatness. There's action a plenty but this film is also funny and tender. It's the kind of thing that, in the wrong hands, would just come across as absurd and stupid but, for some reason, it comes together. There is enough energy and drive from all corners that you can't help but get swept away in the excitement. It's a fucking classic.

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