Thursday, 11 February 2016

TBT - Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves (1991)

So it's been four throwback Thursday's since Alan Rickman died and I'm still remembering him through his classic films. I was only planning to do this for a month to properly mourn his passing but I'm tempted to continue indefinitely until I get all the good ones. There are still a few to chose from and I'd be keen to rewatch them. This weeks film is one I haven't seen in a long time and was both a fantastic and awful thing to do to myself. Watching the film was fucking hilarious because it has not aged well. The major consequence was having the fucking abysmal Bryan Adams song '(Everything I Do) I Do It For You' in my head all day. I've never wanted to bash my head with a frying pan more than I have today.

The legend of Robin Hood is one that has understandably struck a chord with people's imagination. A brave archer who steals from the rich and gives to the poor and still manages to save the damsel in distress: he's exactly the kind of guy young kids grow up wanting to learn about. It's no wonder, then, that he has a long history with films. He is surrounded by excitement, romance and morality. Still, there had been better versions of his tale before and there have been better since. It's certainly weird watching Kevin Reynolds 90s modernised version in the wake of the BBCs recent television series starring Jonas Armstrong.

It's not possibly to say that Reynolds' film stands the test of time and looks more outdated now than some of the earliest films about the eponymous hero probably do. Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves takes the story that we are all so familiar, a band of outlaws taking money and distributing it to the poor, and tries to sex it up. Robin (Kevin Costner) is joined by Azeem (Morgan Freeman), a Moor Robin helped escape from prison and who has vowed to save Robin's life in return. The Sheriff of Nottingham (Alan Rickman) becomes more than just greedy and has turned to the dark arts to attempt to take the throne from the departed King Richard. Newly returned from the Crusades, Robin finds his father dead and vows revenge on the Sheriff and those who helped him... whilst still trying to woo the lovely Maid Marion (Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio). 


Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves is one of my ultimate guilty pleasure movies. There's so much to dislike about it but it's so fucking awful that it's something you can't stop watching. I mean the performances and the script are pretty horrendous and often verge into unintentionally funny. The scenarios are just bizarre at times and the references to other movies is just weird. The fight scenes are so confusing and badly directed that its difficult to see what's going on. The costume design is just misjudged and the sets are inconsistent. It can also boast one of the most annoying songs in film history, probably tying with Armageddon for first place. It's a terrible song and you can see why Reynolds kept it out of the film as much as possible.

It's also an incredibly dark film: both literally and figuratively. Literally, because most of the action takes place in a fucking forest or a castle lit only by candles. Figuratively, because it's really ducking gruesome for a family film. There's so much death, torture, sex and devil worship on display and that's before you get to the final act which is just a lengthy scene of attempted rape intercut with classic one-liners from the Sheriff of Nottingham. The film has a really weird tone which doesn't work at all with the hero as we know him. Overall, is a totally misjudged and badly made film but I fucking love it.

When it comes to our hero, Kevin Costner is particularly dull and decides to go against the norm and play him as an introspective and quiet hero rather than the dashing and sassy man in tights he usually is. He even forgoes the wacky hat and joyful demeanour for a brooding look. Costner really never quite gets the tone of Robin right and, because of Costner's insistence that we get some backstory to Robin's life, he is a man wounded by his experience fighting in the Crusades. I much preferred the fox in Disney's version. At least he always tackled his crazy schemes with a fucking smile on his face.

Then there's the underwhelming love story that really only takes place because it has to. Maid Marion, on the whole, isn't that abysmal and has some real moments of brilliance. She isn't the shy and retiring type when we first meet her and can actually hold her own in a fight. That is until she, very quickly, falls in love with Robin and becomes the helpless damsel who needs to be rescued. Still, Mastrantonio comes across much better than fellow American Christian Slater who plays outlaw Will Scarlett. All three actors struggle with attempting a British accent but Slater fails to convince as an Englishman on so many levels I'm kind of embarrassed for him. Plus, he has one of the least secretive secret histories of any movie character to date.

So, why, I hear you cry, do I love this film so much? For the same reason anyone does. Alan Rickman. Rickman is in a completely different film to anyone else. Rickman actually has fun with his role. He's anything but subtle but that's what we need. He delivers every line perfectly and it's always dripping with venom. This is Rickman at his most venomous but, it's important to note, he's also incredibly funny with it. To say he's the best thing about this film isn't saying much but he's no doubt the reason people come back to this film so often. It's Rickman's film and he fucking smashes it. 

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